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DTF wihout powder.


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Has anyone seen it? I tried with dupont pretreated t-shirt as wet, and dtf printout without powder as wet, pressed together it is okay at first. But after one wash it has some issues like some of print leaving shirt making some parts air filled under print, if you get what i mean. Like it is going to peel off.

Has anyone seen a proper one? If yes, what is the catch?

 

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8 hours ago, anum11 said:

Has anyone seen it? I tried with dupont pretreated t-shirt as wet, and dtf printout without powder as wet, pressed together it is okay at first. But after one wash it has some issues like some of print leaving shirt making some parts air filled under print, if you get what i mean. Like it is going to peel off.

Has anyone seen a proper one? If yes, what is the catch?

 

They use liquid adhesive instead of powder. 

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4 hours ago, johnson4 said:

They use liquid adhesive instead of powder. 

The liquid adhesive is printed from the printhead. 

 

From everything I know it sucks.

 

While my standard powdered prints have gotten rather soft with experience and good supplies/tuning my machines they continue to get softer as washed/worn. I feel for durability reason a liquid adhesive that can't really get down into the fibers isn't going to work well, or for long. They sell only the liquid adhesive, but it's very expensive and requires dedicated channels for it. Some rips can handle it. Color, White, then Adhesive- 3 layers. 

 

I personally think it's just a gimmick, a company trying to get a quick cash grab. But it may have advanced in technology since I last looked, I'm not sure. I'll stick with the standard way for now, most of my customers seem happy with it and it works well. I have shirts going on 70+ washes and still look/feel good. When you compare it to traditional methods that deposit ink instead of dying the fabric, It's very close and achievable to be softer than things like plastisol, water-based inks, vinyl and all that stuff.  The only thing in my eyes that beats it is sublimation in terms of hand feel. 

 

Just my 0.02, Don't let me stop you from searching. 

 

Good luck!

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18 minutes ago, TeedUp said:

I don't have personal experience, but I've heard that if you enjoy white ink clogging your nozzles, then you'll have a barrel of fun with liquid adhesive clogs. Also not sure if true, but I've read that you're locked into the printer vendor for supplies.

Yeah, I mean I seen this over a year ago and if it’s not more dominant in the market than it is, it’s for a reason. 
 


 

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