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Adapting your own dtf printer


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9 hours ago, Craig Keller said:

To start with a new printer to be able to print dtf any suggestions? Has anyone converted a Epson 1400?

it can, just look videos at youtube. There should be for that printer.

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10 hours ago, Craig Keller said:

To start with a new printer to be able to print dtf any suggestions? Has anyone converted a Epson 1400?

Tons of videos that I’ve seen. 
 

research, doing it and making mistakes is how you start. 
 

it’s pretty basic though. find a supported printer by your favorite RIP, check if it has Chipless firmware, aftermarket cartridges. If it has a waste tank, a waste tank resetter. If it doesn’t have. Waste tank an adjustment program to reset it. 
 

remove the rollers, make an output tray- spend a few weeks or months learning hands on and you’ll be fine. 

Edited by johnson4
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9 hours ago, Craig Keller said:

What's better to convert Epson 1400 or Epson eco tank?

Thanks 

To me it’s like asking a stranger if you need a motorcycle or a semi truck to get to work. 

 

each printer model has its own ups and downs, positives and negatives, or overall better suited for a certain type of use and maintenance when it comes to conversions. 
they also come with their own set of headaches. 
 

In reality it will likely get broken whichever you choose within the first couple weeks/months, I wouldn’t sweat it. That’s not being “ negative”, rather realistic. It has a sharp learning curve- not how to make your first print, that’s pretty easy- but how to make your first profitable print and sustain that for months on end without breaking something expensive.
 

my favorite for lower printing requirements was the p400, with the p800 for 50-200 transfers a day. 
 

if you plan on doing 0-15 a day I would go with the 1400. I’d never use an eco tank personally, much better out there for the same price or a bit more with far less long term issues. $1900 can buy you a beast of a machine that can print over 200 10x10’s in a work day. In a rather easy “ push button” style.  So buying a machines for a bit less than half of that that can’t do more or less  than 10-25 a day without serious issues. 

Edited by johnson4
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On 8/23/2022 at 5:50 AM, johnson4 said:

if you plan on doing 0-15 a day I would go with the 1400. I’d never use an eco tank personally, much better out there for the same price or a bit more with far less long term issues. $1900 can buy you a beast of a machine that can print over 200 10x10’s in a work day. In a rather easy “ push button” style.  So buying a machines for a bit less than half of that that can’t do more or less  than 10-25 a day without serious issues. 

So where are you now with your P5000 recommendation? As my favorite most trusted reviewer, perhaps you could clarify/summarize where you are NOW with your top choices at each volume level. (Is it 1400 at the low end, P400 in the middle, P800 at the higher, then dual head xp600s ?)  Detail not necessary, just want to understand your current preferences. Thanks!

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2 hours ago, TeedUp said:

So where are you now with your P5000 recommendation? As my favorite most trusted reviewer, perhaps you could clarify/summarize where you are NOW with your top choices at each volume level. (Is it 1400 at the low end, P400 in the middle, P800 at the higher, then dual head xp600s ?)  Detail not necessary, just want to understand your current preferences. Thanks!

I think it's going to vary from person to person. 

 

I would just recommend buying a purpose built setup from someone with support in your country and a history of good business practices. 

 

Epson conversions will always be disposable and have some flaw in the grand scheme of things. For an actual business that wants to actually make real profit- I would personally avoid Epson conversions for DTF specifically. They are great to learn on and grow from, but know your efforts and costs will ultimately result in throwing it in the trash eventually. Even over super tiny miniscule mistakes. 

 

Going the DIY route has cost more money than I like to admit, It's just like any other manufacturing business. 

 

 

 

 

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