Jump to content

Epson XP-15000 Conversion Some Answers and Some Questions


Recommended Posts

I've always made shirts, mostly for fun, but also a lot for business. So I decided to go this route instead of others. Here's where I'm at so far.

XP-15000, easy to covert to DTF. Here's what I did with a little explanation as I had questions, but lots of the tutorials out there are petty good.

1. Get your printer, your supplies and unpack it all. This includes RIP software and two sets of chipless carts.

2. Turn your printer on > don't plug into computer > don't install carts just select English on the printer don't worry about anything else > install Epson software > disable Epson Monitor and updates - don't use wifi > end process for any Epson stuff running in Task Manager > go to one of the chipless software places listed here > buy a license > run through their instructions - Make sure when you're updating the firmware when an error message pops up at the end don't click try again just click NEXT, then it'll hang up as well on the last part or go real quick, but the button FINISH will be able to be pressed just click it and you're done. It's a little confusing, because those errors and hang ups are normal. Then turn the printer off with the cart carriage moving so it's not docked and you can move it by hand. Unscrew the roller assembly and remove it. There's tons of tutorials out there for this part.

3. Install your RIP software > add your printer > install an ICC profile if you have one for your ink. I'm using Kingdom DTF and they have an ICM profile for their ink in a XP-15000 > go back to the printer and follow instructions on the screen to setup the carts, don't do calibrations as you shouldn't have any carts in there yet. It'll act like it's cleaning and charging the system. I mean at this point you could stick in your DTF ink carts. I didn't have mine yet so I did that later. When you do put in your carts do so through the printer menu for changing carts that way the printer will go through the setup process and charge the system.

4. I built an output tray from a 13" x 19" x 1/4" Acrylic from Tap Plastics and a piece of 1/2" Acrylic 13" long. I then super glued this to the bottom of the other piece to make sure it stayed flat and I also put a hold in the brace to hold it to my printer cart. I'll post a pic if people are interested. I printed some parts on my 3D printer.

5. I'm using CADLink and it seems great so far. Complicated, but not too bad. The best thing to do when doing all this is have a graphic you created printed by a professional to have a reference. This helped me a lot. Before I decided to print my own a week ago I had some made from a pro shop on Etsy. I loaded the same file I had printed by someone else into my RIP. I then printed it, well tried to, I ran into the sheet not feeding (this is a common problem with this model) I turned the printer off, unplugged it, held the power button down until the light turned off (drained the power) then plugged it back in and hit print again. It took two tries of clicking try again on the printer screen. Then it loaded the film. The film I have is from KingdomDTF and is frosty matte, so not clear, but the printer had problems at first. The second print so problem. The first print was using stock settings in CADLink for the XP-15000. WAY too much ink I mean it was flooded. If you load a graphic you want to print and click in the bottom right area there's a button Color Adjust. Stock say Max Ink at 400. I turned mine down to 200, then white to 20% from 50%. That worked. Print came out pretty good. Colors were not like the professional one I got, but that's the software and my settings not the printer. Also you can't print on the last 2" of a sheet as the roller assembly you removed it usually used to hold the media in place and feed it as it's still printing.

6. After that I wait a few minutes and then powdered the print. I'm using a Presto Griddle, large one, from amazon to cure the prints. This worked and didn't work at the same time. The temp controller on the griddle is off by almost a 100 degrees so I'm adding a PID and temp sensor to it and a cover so it's basically a cheap oven, but the print is flat the entire time. I got it to cure then pressed it on a shirt. Not bad for a first time.

7. When refilling or filling your carts the first time use a gram scale if you have it and put everything on the scale, the cart with it's bottom cap on and both plugs. Then fill with ink until the total weight is 28-30 grams. Gently roll your ink bottles back and forth to mix the ink before filling.

I still have lots to learn with the RIP, but it's working I just need some questions answered.

Some of the questions I have:

1. The max resolution built into the CADLink RIP 1440 x 720, but the resolution of this printer is a lot higher.

2. There is a setting in CADLink about how many nozzles to use. Default is 64, but there is one higher, 80 nozzles. Not sure what this is or how it works.

3. When I bring in the graphic that I've had made by someone as a reference and RIP it and look at the raw data (these are terms in CADLink for showing a preview of what the image will look like printed) It looks washed out, this is using 1440x720 Color mode. I can see the image in the view raw data, but if I change the substrate  (meaning what color the shirt is going to be.) to black then the graphic I'm trying to print doesn't even show up. If I use 1440x720 Black (where CADLink will automatically knock out blacks) and RIP it and view raw data nothing shows up. If I change to black substrate I still see nothing. Kind of weird.

4. I still have some testing to do to see how much ink to use and how to get the color I want. 

5. From all the advice on here you only run each color once including white in the RIP. So how does the RIP use white if there are two white ink carts? Does it use some of each during a print?

6. Will this ink work on regular paper so i can go back and do a print hear alignment? I ask cause normally when setting up this printer for the first time you're supposed to do that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

1. Cadlink is not the best software for this printer. Cadlink is always 1440x720 base, which is comparable to other rips at 1440x1440 on the speed. 

Cadlink is also slow though, print drivers may have updated since I used it. To me it’s just not worth it for Epson machines. My tests Cadlink routinely printed 33% slower or more compared to othe Rips. Again this varies based on who made the driver for the printer, but every printer I have compared RIPS with, Cadlink is always the slowest on conversions. 
 

2. i don’t know, this is the part where you just change it and see what happens, timing, quality, etc check it and see for yourself. 
 

3. make your own settings, every rip had flaws and weird things you must get accustomed to. I use Cadlink almost daily on an audley. Personally I thought black only mode meant it only printed black ink, not knocked out the black. 
 

4. Cadlink should have come “ pre set” out of the box to work with your printer. That’s why everyone pushes Cadlink on newcomers. Ink settings included, all that is made when the printer is profiled by Cadlink side. Only changes you can make are limited on cmyk side without knocking your colors out of whack. White is fully adjustable. 
 

5. it uses all the channels per pass. 2 is pretty much a minimum for a good white layer. 
 

6. It works on paper, best on an inkjet transparency to see the white ink. I’ve never done this once on any of my printers, I have used over 50 Epson’s over the years. Never had a problem myself. 
 

good luck

 

Edited by johnson4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cool. Thanks for the clarification. What RIP do you recommend?

So far I haven't had any issues with CADLink, it rips an Illustrator file 13x19 in about 30 seconds. It prints pretty quick too. I do have some new questions now I've printed quite a few pages and cured them. I'll post them below.

Previous questions to which I figured it out:

3. did some research and the View Raw Data is NOT a representation of what's going to be printed. I'm guessing there has to be some kind of preview of the graphic of what it should look like before printing so you can change settings and see the results. The main window on the right show the image of what you add to the queue, mine is pretty pixelated. I bet there is a function to increase the resolution.

5. I had to fill the white ink today mid print and both carts needed ink, so that answers the question about using both white ink carts.

 

New Questions:

1. When refilling the white carts today I noticed one had some cyan bleeding into it. The cart sponge had a little blue in it. On the other side the other white cart had a little yellow bleeding into it. Is this normal, how do I stop this?

2. If you look at pic 1 you can see that I'm holding up the cured print up to the light. You can see a ton of pin holes. Is this from curing the print with DTF powder? If so what am I doing wrong?

3. Look at the next pic this is the print backside after curing. it looks like the grain is rather large. Does this look OK for after a cure? I mean if not do I need more heat, less heat, more time, less time? Next pic is my griddle that I put a stainless piece on to keep the heat in like an oven. I also put a calibrated thermocouple reading the air temp inside. Once it's warmed up it stays pretty consistent at 244-250F.

4. Look at the green stem of the graphic. It's kind of grainy like you see the dots from the printing. This is the same graphic I had professionally printed. Theirs is a solid green as all the other colors are. Now is that normal as the pro is probably using a way better machine or is this just a function of using the RIP software correctly?

Also here's a pic of the output tray I made out of acrylic. Not the best design but works for this cart.

 

IMG_1337.HEIC IMG_1336.HEIC IMG_1338.HEIC IMG_1340.HEIC IMG_1334.HEIC

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, cartierusm said:

Cool. Thanks for the clarification. What RIP do you recommend?

So far I haven't had any issues with CADLink, it rips an Illustrator file 13x19 in about 30 seconds. It prints pretty quick too. I do have some new questions now I've printed quite a few pages and cured them. I'll post them below.

Previous questions to which I figured it out:

3. did some research and the View Raw Data is NOT a representation of what's going to be printed. I'm guessing there has to be some kind of preview of the graphic of what it should look like before printing so you can change settings and see the results. The main window on the right show the image of what you add to the queue, mine is pretty pixelated. I bet there is a function to increase the resolution.

5. I had to fill the white ink today mid print and both carts needed ink, so that answers the question about using both white ink carts.

 

New Questions:

1. When refilling the white carts today I noticed one had some cyan bleeding into it. The cart sponge had a little blue in it. On the other side the other white cart had a little yellow bleeding into it. Is this normal, how do I stop this?

2. If you look at pic 1 you can see that I'm holding up the cured print up to the light. You can see a ton of pin holes. Is this from curing the print with DTF powder? If so what am I doing wrong?

3. Look at the next pic this is the print backside after curing. it looks like the grain is rather large. Does this look OK for after a cure? I mean if not do I need more heat, less heat, more time, less time? Next pic is my griddle that I put a stainless piece on to keep the heat in like an oven. I also put a calibrated thermocouple reading the air temp inside. Once it's warmed up it stays pretty consistent at 244-250F.

4. Look at the green stem of the graphic. It's kind of grainy like you see the dots from the printing. This is the same graphic I had professionally printed. Theirs is a solid green as all the other colors are. Now is that normal as the pro is probably using a way better machine or is this just a function of using the RIP software correctly?

Also here's a pic of the output tray I made out of acrylic. Not the best design but works for this cart.

 

IMG_1337.HEIC 3.51 MB · 1 download IMG_1336.HEIC 2.53 MB · 0 downloads IMG_1338.HEIC 1.5 MB · 0 downloads IMG_1340.HEIC 2.92 MB · 0 downloads IMG_1334.HEIC 1.49 MB · 0 downloads

I meant overall print speed not RIP speed, Cadlink takes longer to print than others rips, or has done so In all my testing. One of my favorites is 5 minutes on another rip, 16 minutes on Cadlink exact same settings, file and sheet print size. 

If it works for you and you are happy with it, it’s apples to oranges. We all have our preference and based on that there is no “true” best, it’s all only preference. For me, my preference is fast as possible and high quality- not necessarily feature packed( which I don’t use) and easy to setup. 
 

i like fine tuning every aspect, I can’t do that in Cadlink without multiple add on features, so overall I prefer other rips. 

Edited by johnson4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cadlink is notorious for grainy colors. It’s normal unless you fine tune your own profiles.

 

You have head strikes as well. If you wet capped it’ll do it, poor fitting aftermarket carts, tons of things. It’s a learning process for sure. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks again. What RIP do you use? I'm not tied to CADLink I could probably get a refund. I've only had it less than the free trial period anyway (I did purchase it though). I got it because it seemed like most people thought Acrorip was not good and CADLink seemed professional. I've been doing graphic design for over 30 years so I would never use all those built in features.

 

What causes head strikes?

Also what is wet capping? I heard the term before, but not in relation to this printer.

 

Thanks, sorry for all the questions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

49 minutes ago, cartierusm said:

Thanks again. What RIP do you use? I'm not tied to CADLink I could probably get a refund. I've only had it less than the free trial period anyway (I did purchase it though). I got it because it seemed like most people thought Acrorip was not good and CADLink seemed professional. I've been doing graphic design for over 30 years so I would never use all those built in features.

 

What causes head strikes?

Also what is wet capping? I heard the term before, but not in relation to this printer.

 

Thanks, sorry for all the questions.

If you do all of your design work outside of cadlink, then it doesn't bring much to the table. Any changes you do make within the program to images can't be saved, so if you need repeatable results doing outside of the program is best anyway. 

 

Cadlink is reliable and always gets updates. It is supported in a way that will keep it up to date, they support alot of printers, functions, and print methods. They sell add-ons for multiple things, including making your own profiles. However, When I asked to purchase this I was faced with a rude comment as-if I am incapable of comprehending the complexity of such things and they do not have the time to hold my hand ( literally this was said). Ironically, their " self help" system built in happens to have instructions for this.  I've tried multiple times but these are generally the responses I get. So I only use CADlink if it is required by the printer, in which case I would reach out to the seller of the printer for help, not cadlink. 

 

When my license quit working ( twice now) from the Dongle, It took a few days but we got it situated. I was careful to step around what I was saying though, they insinuated this would cost money. They only offer support for like 90 days ( Something short) unless you purchase yearly support subscriptions. 

 

Overall, I feel cadlink was a quick money grab from the beginning. It's easy for new users and makes things just work relatively easy. Making things " the best" however it just doesn't work well. Most people I have worked with side to side over the last year and a half have all strayed away from cadlink to Acro, Dev Studio or some other Rip I don't remember. 

 

The key functions this software lacks are the key functions I look for. However, these key functions also make it hard for users to get printing without tons of waste, frustration, and overall customer support. So- Cut to- Do you want to call a Prius a sports car because it gets you from Point A to point B because it's easy, or are you looking for actual results that will be beneficial to your business while others are stuck sending out low quality prints? If so, I'd go with another RIP. 

 

In the end, Cadlink dumbed down their own software to get it to a lower price point for new basic users can get up and running quickly. The software was normally over $1,000 until DTF came out. It's quick and easy, but It is far from the best print speeds and print quality. I am sure it is capable of this- but without dealing with underhanded comments, dropping cash for add-ons and spending alot of time on it overall. It's just going to be for the most entry level users to feel like they are printing great transfers with the push of a button. 

 

Me personally, I don't recommend anything other than you testing all your options, spending at least a few days with each until you understand and get a feel for them, you'll quickly pick a favorite. It likely won't be cadlink. 

 

As far as I know, all licenses are sold as-is non-returnable or refundable. Might as well keep it and try, Don't be discouraged based on my comments. I'm just saying don't limit yourself, Acro 9 is a great way to test Acro, If it works well for you, then know the newer versions are better. Try Ekprint, Dev Studio, WhiteRip, I mean all you can find. Do it before you get busy, before you start selling or doing anything that will prohibit these changes in the future. Otherwise, you'll run into these problems mid-production and find yourself in a pickle. I've watched several businesses fail over this.

 

Good luck!

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, cartierusm said:

Ok great. Good to know. Print quality is most important to me. I'll try some of the others.

For print quality, cadlink gives me the worst, however it is pretty accurate on the colors. BUT, With Acro, or other rips you can profile your own printer and load the profile into the RIP and achieve the same results. It's what the backend does with cadlink, the part you don't see. You can change these things on cadlink as well, but like I said, I personally don't feel like it's worth it. 

 

Not knocking them, but just because everyone uses them doesn't mean it's great. It means it's easy.

 

Try AcroRip ( sorry 9 doesn't work on the 15000) or reach out to people who have. 

Try the EKprint demo, it's free. works with it well- actually the first one to work with it well. 

 

Overall, For Epson conversions you are in for quite a bit of learning. Might as well do it with a good RIP. 

 

For these high end machines, Cadlink works pretty well with them. The people selling the machines drop cash for support and fine tuning things and can have issues fixed with a flick of a finger. Afterall, They are after the best and quickest way to keep their customers happy after dropping wads of cash on a printer.  So reaching out to the printer seller at this point is really easy and works well.

 

Since you are using a conversion though, it's not going to be nearly the same. You'll be alone with the help of some other users, who are likely inexperienced themselves. This causes problems because what some people swear by, will soon enough be a learning experience that changes their mind. So I recommend bypassing that- and manage your own losses and experiences. It'll take time and money, but once you come out the other side it's easy.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, cartierusm said:

"For Epson conversions you are in for quite a bit of learning." In what regard? So far I've got it printing pretty good, just a few things that seem to be the RIP.

When you start printing and get to printing 10-20-30 prints a day, you'll know what I mean. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One more question that I guess answers itself.

CADLink right off the bat put down way too much ink. It had max ink at 400. I turned it down to 200 and now I'm trying it at 250. So my question is should I keep bumping up the ink until it gets runny? I guess that makes a thicker print. So I'm thinking keep testing the ink levels until I get a good solid print with no show through, but not too much ink?

I guess the carts are bleeding into each other, not a ton, but a little. I'm assuming I should use a different brand of replacement carts or use the starter carts that came with the machine, clean them out completely (soaking in water to remove all the ink) then refilling them with DTF Ink??

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, cartierusm said:

One more question that I guess answers itself.

CADLink right off the bat put down way too much ink. It had max ink at 400. I turned it down to 200 and now I'm trying it at 250. So my question is should I keep bumping up the ink until it gets runny? I guess that makes a thicker print. So I'm thinking keep testing the ink levels until I get a good solid print with no show through, but not too much ink?

I guess the carts are bleeding into each other, not a ton, but a little. I'm assuming I should use a different brand of replacement carts or use the starter carts that came with the machine, clean them out completely (soaking in water to remove all the ink) then refilling them with DTF Ink??

The ink density is setup when the person made the driver for CADlink. Max ink from my understanding is the limit to prevent flooding. Basically what is the most ink it can put down, no matter what is requested. Anything at or above that number is considered max. This is not where you adjust ink density. 

 

That's the thing with cadlink, what you are looking for to adjust doesn't exist. It's made during the driver creation. You can adjust the " saturation" or " brightness" of each color to remove ink. You can also adjust the color adjustments, however this is what the ICC profile used for it is going to be based on. Basically linearized.

 

Acro you can just click X percentage for each color, cadlink is not this way- that's the part that makes it " easy". All you can change is the white ink under base, to a certain degree. 

 

Out of the box it should be printing without flooding. I would check other issues. You do need a rather large ink deposit, from the photo's above I do not see too much ink going down. If not, Reach out to cadlink. 

 

I am in no degree a "master" of cadlink. I have used tested and messed with every available function without buying "add-on" modules. What you are looking for is exactly what I wanted as well. I was asked to pay for an add-on to create my own print driver/ICC for this. When you create an ICC in cadlink it also sets up the ink limit from what I understand which is why you can't change it other than the up to 7 on the slider scale. 

 

Like I said, Sounds like you might be looking for Acro or EKprint. 

Edited by johnson4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

LOL No worries, I appreciate you taking the time. Max Ink does affect how much ink comes out of the nozzles. When I first fired up the program and printed the ink ran like puddles. It's stock set at 400, which makes absolutely no sense. I turned it down to 200 and it printed great. Then I bumped it up to 250 and 50% for white underbase and it's printing great now. I think I have only one last problem with CADLink and that is getting the color correct and I'm getting close.

And you can adjust each of CMYK as well as saturation and other options. For me it seems like all the options are there, but I'm not counting my chickens just yet. All the prints I have done so far, 6 or so, the image on the screen in CADLink and printed out look washed out. No idea why, I didn't know anything was wrong until I was messing around and printed one that isn't washed out, also not washed out on the screen. Not sure what I did, but I usually delete the file from the lower "finished" queue and I didn't for some reason so I have that RIP. I'm going to go through it right now and see what I changed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, cartierusm said:

LOL No worries, I appreciate you taking the time. Max Ink does affect how much ink comes out of the nozzles. When I first fired up the program and printed the ink ran like puddles. It's stock set at 400, which makes absolutely no sense. I turned it down to 200 and it printed great. Then I bumped it up to 250 and 50% for white underbase and it's printing great now. I think I have only one last problem with CADLink and that is getting the color correct and I'm getting close.

And you can adjust each of CMYK as well as saturation and other options. For me it seems like all the options are there, but I'm not counting my chickens just yet. All the prints I have done so far, 6 or so, the image on the screen in CADLink and printed out look washed out. No idea why, I didn't know anything was wrong until I was messing around and printed one that isn't washed out, also not washed out on the screen. Not sure what I did, but I usually delete the file from the lower "finished" queue and I didn't for some reason so I have that RIP. I'm going to go through it right now and see what I changed.

Nice, Hopefully you get it working well for you. I went down that rabbit hole and I never want to go back, haha. 

Edited by johnson4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok got my first clog. Yellow I think. My Maintenance Tank is almost full so I gotta wait until my chip resetter gets here, but thanks to Johnson4 I made a lot of progress today.

1. I was getting pin holes from too much heat when curing my print as per Johnson4's suggestion I let my print sit for 25 minutes as I was doing something else and then powdering it.

2. I didn't end up using the griddle contraption I made. I know, from using these things in other projects, that they have one element running in a U and doesn't heat up evenly. So I used my Heat Press. I have a Hotronix Fusion, so not a clam-shell press. I made two HDPE Plastic 3/8" spacers for top and bottom of the platen. I then set the pressure to almost nothing. Luckily with this press when the pressure is almost nothing it still touched the bottom platen. I then turned it on. The set temp is what I press these transfers at, 320F. Once up to temp I heated up the bottom platen by closing the press for 1 minute. Then I opened it up and put my transfer on with the spacers and closed it for 1 minutes. CAME OUT PERFECT. No pin holes at all. Powder looks perfectly cured. Now if I was doing this for a living I would by the mini shaker curer. Good price for what it is.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, cartierusm said:

Ok got my first clog. Yellow I think. My Maintenance Tank is almost full so I gotta wait until my chip resetter gets here, but thanks to Johnson4 I made a lot of progress today.

1. I was getting pin holes from too much heat when curing my print as per Johnson4's suggestion I let my print sit for 25 minutes as I was doing something else and then powdering it.

2. I didn't end up using the griddle contraption I made. I know, from using these things in other projects, that they have one element running in a U and doesn't heat up evenly. So I used my Heat Press. I have a Hotronix Fusion, so not a clam-shell press. I made two HDPE Plastic 3/8" spacers for top and bottom of the platen. I then set the pressure to almost nothing. Luckily with this press when the pressure is almost nothing it still touched the bottom platen. I then turned it on. The set temp is what I press these transfers at, 320F. Once up to temp I heated up the bottom platen by closing the press for 1 minute. Then I opened it up and put my transfer on with the spacers and closed it for 1 minutes. CAME OUT PERFECT. No pin holes at all. Powder looks perfectly cured. Now if I was doing this for a living I would by the mini shaker curer. Good price for what it is.

Be careful leaving it clogged and sitting- if you can help it. 

 

Glad it's working out though!

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree, but I'm afraid that if I use my cleaning carts it'll take the Maintenance tank below 15% and then I can't reset it.

If I do decide to do a cleaning with my cleaning carts should I leave them in until I get my chip resetter? Some posts say not to as it'll leak into the printer. What say you?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

24 minutes ago, cartierusm said:

I agree, but I'm afraid that if I use my cleaning carts it'll take the Maintenance tank below 15% and then I can't reset it.

If I do decide to do a cleaning with my cleaning carts should I leave them in until I get my chip resetter? Some posts say not to as it'll leak into the printer. What say you?

Cleaning carts do leak, So I would agree, avoid letting it sit with them in. If you did a cleaning with the cleaning carts ( I would) You could then suck all the liquid out of the reservoir side so there is nothing to leak- just the damp sponge. Should work.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

LOL sorry for being obtuse, but suck the liquid out of where? The side of the cartridge that doesn't have the sponge? Just the damp sponge, meaning the other side of the cart with the sponge? Just making sure because there's that little cleaning pad under the carriage that the carts clean themselves off in.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
15 minutes ago, cartierusm said:

LOL sorry for being obtuse, but suck the liquid out of where? The side of the cartridge that doesn't have the sponge? Just the damp sponge, meaning the other side of the cart with the sponge? Just making sure because there's that little cleaning pad under the carriage that the carts clean themselves off in.

yea the place you put the ink in. If that is empty then there wouldn't be anything to leak except what is suspended by the sponge meaning no pressure to cause a leak.  I've never done this, just an idea that might help. 

The capping station sponge, if you wet cap it will mix the liquids in the carts and potentially wick back up the side of the printhead and damaged the head on this printer. I've done it. 

Edited by johnson4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...