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Is DTF workable with Yellow transfer paper?


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4 hours ago, anum11 said:

Have anyone tried this? If yes would we still need to remove rollers?

I feel like you know the answer to this question before you asked. At least, in the roller aspect. What is “ yellow transfer paper”? I’d be more than happy to try it if it’s obtainable. If your talking about plastisol paper, then no, it doesn’t. 

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2 hours ago, uhim said:

What is "yellow copy paper"? --- This is baking paper, used for screen printing as a DTF

I don’t see how that would work, the DTF film has a coating to keep the ink from           “ running” or dripping like an ink barrier.  Seems like it would also wrinkle from the liquid. 
 

Is that a thing that people do?

 

Edited by johnson4
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1 hour ago, uhim said:

Silicone baking paper can withstand high temperatures. Previously, it was used with plastisol transvers, as now they use a film for DTF.

Weird, I use both, silicone paper and the actual plastisol transfer paper for my DTG curing. I tried printing on both, doesn’t work. The ink just runs off the paper, as I kind of expected, but ya know, worth a shot. 
 

unless your just talking about screen printing, then I can see how that would work just fine. 

Edited by johnson4
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2 minutes ago, anum11 said:

Yeah exactly like this. But it does not hold more than %40 ink with acrorip mix color DOT size settings. So it did not give anywhere near good result for me. But i seen good prints on it with sublime CMYK and plastisol white on it.

I wonder how they get the ink thick enough to stay put, yet able to jet from the printer. 

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Just now, johnson4 said:

I wonder how they get the ink thick enough to stay put, yet able to jet from the printer. 

Dunno yet, i am working on it maybe There are better papers than i used. It did not hold near enough for only CMYK too. 

Btw what are your paper baking settings and heat transfer settings? Also can we bake paper on heat transfer if yes at what pressure and what degree?

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11 minutes ago, anum11 said:

Dunno yet, i am working on it maybe There are better papers than i used. It did not hold near enough for only CMYK too. 

Btw what are your paper baking settings and heat transfer settings? Also can we bake paper on heat transfer if yes at what pressure and what degree?

I think the issue is just in the ink/film. The film for DTF has a coating, that acts as a barrier for the ink preventing run off. I print both cmyk and white at 50 percent with great results.  Anything else I’ve printed on, the ink is too watery ( but less watery than any other ink I have here except screenprinting ink) to stay put. So you need either a thicker ink( which would probably be impossible and to keep the ink flow in any type of printhead) or to use a paper with a barrier, maybe a heated print bed to “ quick evaporate” the ink as it’s printed or something. 
 

it uses very little ink, 10ML each color ( 40ML white) lasted 30 8x10 prints before I felt uncomfortable continuing without refilling. 
 

im not sure I understand your question on the two papers, I use them to cure my pretreatment instead of wasting silicone parchment paper on every shirt. They easily last 100 shirts each for that. I also use them on my 2nd press on DTG white curing, to give it a smooth, matte, finish and  allow it to dry without wrinkling my parchment. 
 

I reuse the same 4 parchment and 4 plastisol papers all day( over 150 shirts sometimes), unless I smear ink on them. The plastisol sheets usually last a good week or so, but that’s for curing my shirts/pretreatment  

 

I haven’t really done anything with the DTF, as I’ve been busy. But the concept for making it work appears to be pretty straight forward. You need something that will hot peel the ink with a matte finish, and yet also prevent it from dripping or smearing in the papers. A good example is printing on the DTF film backwards.

Edited by johnson4
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You might be able to use DTG ink with pretreatment covered Film(dry) same concept, the powder would work the same in my opinion, just have a much longer drying time. As long as the film will release the cured water based ink. 
 

in my truthful opinion, the DTF ink is a diluted form of plastisol, it’s water resistant when wet, dries really fast with heat( like 30 seconds is too much), not at all when air dried. Releases next to no “vapors” when drying. Whatever they are using as a carrier, probably reacts to whatever is on the film. If you out too much ink down, it wicks it away from the edge, just like DTG. Problem is, if that happens, powder sticks to it, ruining the print, just like the DTG shirt would stain. 
 

might look into plastisol reducers/thinners and see what you can come up with. Then, see what kind of “ salts” can be used to absorb that edge liquid and create a barrier so it doesn’t run or drip. 

Edited by johnson4
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