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  1. Version 20.0.0

    1,257 downloads

    This code is a full version intended for use with our V2 AIO and shield boards. Can also be used with a standard Arduino Uno. Settings are for the Epson P600 Requirements: encoder and bounce2 library in Arduino IDE 5v to 3v step down on the PE and ASF signals to protect the Epson 30 tooth pulley
    5 points
  2. I feel this post is a giant advertisement for yourself, and I disagree with most of your statements. I have screen printed for 6+ years, used DTG for around 3 years and DTF for about 6 months. Your figures are incorrect and an opinion of yourself. For the most part, I have experience that several things you have said are NOT TRUE. all you are doing is trying to convince others of your “marketing” convictions to try and sway opinions by throwing in a few well known facts, mixed with lies. anyone reading this post, again this is one persons opinion(who mind you is looking for financial benefits). I highly recommended taking this post with a grain of salt, doing your own research and not falling for the traps. I’m not going to argue on key points here, it’s a waste of my time and anyone else who will be reading it. If you are truly interested in the truth, do your own research people. All three methods are great, but come with their own downfalls. You can do many things this post says you can’t. Personally, I utilize all three methods, when it’s appropriate. No “ single” method is best. good luck and happy printing!
    4 points
  3. I use EKprint because it’s simple, quick and efficient. Acro rip, I don’t like. I wasted a couple months using it and just outright hating my investments. Some people like it and get good results, I never did. The color settings were hard to get right, it took forever to process the image when printing, among other limited settings and the fact they are all pirated. I Went with EKprint, and can run 4 printers at the same time, make my own platen sizes. For me anyway, EKprint was super easy to understand, has minimal adjustments to get a decent print all around and I can print on the fly very quickly. kothari, has like the “ masters degree” amount of adjustments and can be overwhelming, if not a bit tedious in a high production environment. This amount of settings makes it hard to “diagnose” any settings issues as well, which you will encounter trying to adjust things right. Personally I feel even the “ basic” stuff is more complicated than it needs to be with kothari. That plus the price tag made it a hard choice but people spoke highly of it. It may be worth it for dtg with ink savings and fine tuning, I just don’t think dtf will need that. If kothari had a better Support system , and had one on one support, ( in the moment when you need it) I’d probably buy it for dtg. But in my opinion, a well executed program should need little intervention to learn the basics, but time after time I see questions on how to use it with little detailed responses.
    4 points
  4. 1. about the same, DTF uses much less ink( about 1/3rd for me, plus the ink is almost half the cost of DTG ink at the moment) no pre-treatment. But to offset that, your spending money now on film and powder. depending on your print size and film cost, DTF may be a bit more expensive. Time wise, they take about the same amount of time. 2. about the same, you really only shake the cartridges, print with it, and clean the capping station/print-head with a foam swab either way. 3. DTG offers next to no hand feel, DTF can be thin or thick, soft or plastic-y depending on how you press it. The end result is kind of like a plastisol transfer. It's definitely a heavier hand. I know my customers have come to expect a certain quality from me using Screen-printing and DTG. If I switched to DTF, I'd get a ton of complaints. People try to get away from the thick, heavy, prone to peeling aspect of things. I continuously get contacted about how awesome it is that I don't use vinyl, and have actually gotten quite a bit of business from word of mouth over it. I'm not saying DTF peels, I'm simply saying at the end user level, it's obviously a " heat pressed" print, and people generally associate that with the price point and overall quality. Do the transfer right, lightly powdered, and proper ink levels and it can come out very soft and smooth as well. The larger the print, the more noticeable it will be though. I have managed to do a few that are hardly discernible from each other compared to DTG. Imagine it like this: For DTG you have a print that soaks into the fabric for the most part, but the ink layer is super thin, flexible. The pre-treatment washes away afterwards. Screenprinting, you push the ink into the fabric, and leave a small deposit on top, again a very thin layer of flexible ink, but depending on how you do it, can be extremely thick or thin as well, it's up to you. I make mine as thin as possible, and it comes out very well. DTF is using the same aspect, if it were only ink, like the above two methods, it would be as equally as soft. However, your basically adding plastic to the wet ink in a layer on the back. Then that plastic is pressed into the shirt as an adhesive. So now, instead of the ink adhering itself like the other two methods, it now has a layer of plastic under it. At the moment, there is no way around this plastic, and you can feel it. how to manage to apply that, makes a huge difference. In short, Screen printing is the cheapest, DTG is the most versatile, DTF is the easiest. The quality of each reflect that. Some people will love it, some people will hate it, some people will sink thousands into it and decide to use something else just like everything else new that pops up in this market. In the last almost 5 years, I have seen at least 4 new " WOW" products come along and disappear. If you are looking for a reputable way to start a business and want to maintain a quality product, you will not solely use DTF transfers. It's great for an addition to DTG/Screen-printing. You can absolutely use it for that purpose though, that is up to you. But to compare them in this aspect, based on how easy it is to maintain, and the cost, isn't the only thing you need to think about. The BEST way for anyone to decide if they should use which method, Get samples of DTG, samples of DTF, Samples of Screenprinted materials. Compare them all, ask your friends blindly which they like, and which they would pay money for before putting potentially thousands of dollars into something that might end up as a bust in your eyes. At the end of the day, only you are responsible for what you spend your money on.
    4 points
  5. I figured I'd make a post since this is one of the most popular questions right now. The list of printers that are good for DTF is basically the same as for DIY DTG: https://www.opendtg.com/topic/3-which-printers-to-use-for-diy-dtg/ You need an Epson printer with 6-8 colors / ink channels so you can print CMYK + White inks, available refillable cartridges, and compatible RIP software. The most popular models are going to be the best to use unless you are fine with figuring things out on your own. L1800 (1430 w/ bulk ink) is used a lot because it's cheap and available outside of the USA. It prints 13x19 but is very slow. 15 minutes plus for a full print. 6 channel printhead P400 is at least 3 times faster than the L1800 / 1430 because it is a 8 channel DX5 printhead. Ink cartridges or CISS plug in right on top of the printhead so there is easy access to the head and not much wasted ink to flush the printhead out when the printer needs to sit for days without use. 13x19 max print size P600 is fast like the p400 with a 8 channel DX7 printhead. It is better if you're printing daily with volume because of the built in pressurized ink system and available 80ml cartridges. Because of the ink system not using often will cause white ink separation in the lines and you'll have to waste ink to get it out. 13x19 max print size P800 has a wider 17" print width. It too have a ink system built in like the P600. Many of these models are discontinued but places like OpenDTG have a stock of them. NEW Epson P700 and P900. These aren't good for DTF / DTG yet because there is not refillable ink cartridges or RIP software for them yet. There are older and smaller model Epson printers that will work. Some of them are listed here on the DIY DTG list: https://www.opendtg.com/topic/3-which-printers-to-use-for-diy-dtg/ Feel free to comment below with more models or information.
    3 points
  6. I've just gone through the process of converting a second hand Epson P600 for DTF and thought I'd document some of the steps I've taken, settings I use etc. - it may help someone else attempting the same Needless to say, there will be nuances and variations around your particular setup. The info below represents the outcome of trial and error, Googling and researching etc. (putting it all in one place - I wish I'd had this before I stated *grins*). I'm using AcroRIP 9.0.3 Step 1 - Removing the Rollers Don't be daunted by this, it really is very simple. A small flat blade screwdriver is all you need to pop these loose and slide them out. No printer disassembly is needed. Step 2 - Adding the DTF Ink Using refillable cartridges, I've installed in this order: YWWMCWWK - the final cartridge (MK) is filled with a mix of distilled water and a dash of printer cleaning fluid. In AcroRIP 9.0.3 I've set the printer as Stylus Photo R3000, selected the port the SC-P600 is connected to, and set the Ink Channels under 'Color Management' to match the installed sequence. Step 3 - Waste Tank (optional) While you can make your own, I snagged a ready to go one from Ebay for speed and convenience. Step 4 - Output Tray The purpose of the output tray is to support the film as it exits the printer. It needs to be positioned so that the top of your output tray is only 1-2mm lower than the top of the output rollers in the printer. If there's a drop, the film will bend as it exits; when it bends during feeding the film will catch the printhead or other parts of the printer and smear the ink. I had some A2 foam board which I used for a makeshift output support. The board is 5mm thick. As you can see in the image, I made a couple of cutouts at the sides so that the tray slides neatly into the printer exit area. The back end of the support rests on the end of the fully extended output tray, and to keep the front (printer facing) edge in place I 3D printed a couple of supports. These are 70mm high and rest neatly on the open bottom front cover of the printer. At some point I'll do a neater version of this (it's a bit bigger than it needs to be), but it does the job. Step 6 - AcroRIP 9.0.3 Settings You'll need to play around with your own Ink Limit settings, and White Layer Generation etc. These are the settings I've used successfully. And that's it... you may or may not find this useful If you are having issued with film feeding, leave a stack of paper in the tray (I've got about 8mm of A4, in landscape, and the film feeds reliably). Another point is don't close the paper guides tightly against the film - leave a 5mm gap. You should have all the paper width check settings on the printer OFF. Oh, one last thing - in terms of sprinkling the DTF powder on to the print, I'm now using one of these little shakers (medium size holes). It makes it quite quick and easy to get coverage on most of the print. What ingenious methods have you all come up with to recover the surplus powder once you've applied it? I'm using the hover method of curing via my heat press - about 2 minutes at 170 degrees, hovvering about 1cm above the film. When pressing the garment, 20 seconds at 170 degrees, medium pressure seems to do the trick nicely. I then re-press under silicon paper for another 10 seconds.
    3 points
  7. Version 1.0.0

    1,151 downloads

    This code is a full version intended for use with our V2 AIO and shield boards. Can also be used with a standard Arduino Uno. Code has settings for the Epson 1430 model Requirements: encoder and bounce2 library in Arduino IDE 5v to 3v step down on the PE and ASF signals to protect the Epson 30 tooth pulley needed
    3 points
  8. not a problem. Open ekprint Click Configuration-printer setup Feed mode- manual( rear) Should also be set to 1440x1440 for both of the image/underbase resolutions. That single 13x19 page was the one I made to use for myself, I don't recommend printing over 12" wide with it. it can be adjusted however you wish if you need to change it.
    2 points
  9. Never tried, from my understanding only EKprint supports it at this moment. It’s what I use anyway.
    2 points
  10. Time for a followup on this post. Man, amazing what you what you can learn in 2 weeks... At this point I have the XP-15000 printing transfers from end to end. I'm still working out my settings for consistent powder melt, but that has nothing to do with the printer. The only modifications I've made to the printer is removing the 2 screws that hold the roller bracket in place and removing the roller bracket, installing the chipless firmware, and making a tray out of Dollar Tree Foam to keep the film close to the height it's being printed at so the film won't lift when it close to the end of the page (you'll know what I mean if you convert this printer and use sheets instead of rolls). Knowing what I know now, I could convert this printer in under 30 minutes. If I had all the needed supplies, ink, film, power, blah blah blah (which I do now), I could convert this printer and be up and printing transfers in under an hour. I received plenty of help from this forum when I ran into a few problems, mainly with EKPRINT settings. I won't mention any names, since I don't want to be responsible for them getting bombarded with messages. If any of them read this and they can volunteer their services themselves. I know there is much more in store, since I'm new to DTF, but I'm not new to tech, hardware, digital art (mostly illustrator) and working with new hardware modifications. From my experience, the hard part is over, fear of the unknown. This printer prints transfers as good, if not better than, the transfers I've purchased. I'm not saying it's better or worse than any other DTF printer, since I have no bar of comparison, but I will say that I'm pretty picky about the quality of t-shirts I sell, and I'm very happy with the results I'm getting. I no longer have to worry about buying from someone who just wants to make $ and doesn't really care about quality (The reds in my transfers are actually the same color red as my art now!). I'm 100% certain I'll run into plenty of bumps in the road since this seems to be a newer printer in the DTF scene and I'm also new to the DTF scene, but as far as getting the XP-15000 up and printer transfers, it's not tough at all. Even without help from this forum, a tech savvy resourceful person shouldn't have too much trouble. I you start out with absolutely nothing but a heat press, like me (well I do have a workshop and a lot of tools and supplies in general) you can get in the game with this printer for under $1,500. That may seem like a lot, but that's EVERYTHING you will need: Printer, RIP software, ink, film, powder, extra maint boxes, maint box resetter, multiple sets empty ink carts, print head cleaner, little sponge tip cleaner thingys, syringes, needles and a few other weird things you prob thought you wouldn't need... You'll make that money back making transfers for yourself if you run a brand or or sell custom tees using transfers. If you already have a print business, this is really low risk to see if you want to get into the DTF side of the biz. And if you're a hobbyist that kind of does a little of both, like me, it's a nice thing to have around that should easily pay for itself, and if it doesn't, it's worth the learning experience. Hope this helps. I'm more than happy to answer any questions, since others were happy to answer mine.
    2 points
  11. Hi Phil Looks good I used 5mm acrylic sheet for my tray very shiney makes the film glide out easy, I'm working on a roller and vacuum system with a stepper motor so that the film comes fully out from the printer. When it's ready I will post the info. And thanks for your post if only I had seen your post months ago would of saved me alot of time Regards
    2 points
  12. Rip software is available for this printer, I just purchased 3 of the refurbs for short run sheet only use, for one of them anyway. as for the ciss, that’s a waste of money. Get some refillable carts from aliexpress for $20 and just swap them out every 15-20 prints. A ciss, with white ink is a major headache. However, if you insist on a CISS, just use those same $20 carts, with a cheap $10-15 6 color ciss ink tank. $150 is highway robbery. my intentions: remove rollers make chipless use 3 sets of refillable cartridges for ink, swap them when they come close to empty. use EKprint use my regular film ( they all use just about the same pickup method, I haven’t had any issues). make an output tray make a waste tank and install it. like this, I’ll have a quick, Disposable unit for short run( or mistakes in my prints from the roll printer) designs for under $350, I already own EKprint. also, without a ciss, you just shake the ink carts every other day. Want to take a break? Throw in some carts with cleaner, do two head cleans and let it sit for months without issue. with a ciss, you deal with wasted separated ink/runny prints if it isn’t printed with daily. as well, ciss tanks on a printer like this have to be placed at a specific height, and maintain a specific ink level or they leak all the ink out, siphoning it from the ink tanks until it equalizes. Basically, a huge mess and wasted ink. some people use and love them, I do for pigmented ink printers. For this type of stuff, I HATE ciss systems, but that’s my opinion
    2 points
  13. The output tray should be 1-2mm lower than the top of the output roller, what do you have it as? if it’s mainly at the bottom of the print, I’d suggest it has nothing to do with the ink. Making it go with two channels slowed down my production, but It does work. the film should not bow, or arch in anyway when the printer prints. Look at it straight on as it comes out, I bet you’ll see it bubble up.
    2 points
  14. Turns out really well. Printed using a p400, heavy cotton sweatshirt, White ink only DTF. An otherwise unprintable( raised seam on the print area) garment due to its design with My DTG setup. I hadn’t used, shaken, cleaned or maintained the printer in 3 weeks. Shook the carts well, did two head cleans and this came out. Unimaginable with DTG due to clogging/drying out.
    2 points
  15. So, I’m probably going to take this design and build up from it, since I understand the concept and it works. this build used mainly repurposed materials. I’ve always done things like that( I like making stuff) and not care about the aesthetics, I’m not a perfectionist and always want to try and utilize what I already have. With that said, Since I’m taking it serious this time, I’ll do a few things differently to make a better, almost as cheap end result. I will make a list of materials, cost, and where I obtained them. I will also make very specific instructions, with photos. Any code or “ self made” designs I may make can be shared. I of course would also be here to help. basically, it would be a tutorial, including everything but materials to make the same thing at home with some possible substitutions for places that can’t obtain specific things. Aside from the printer etc, I’d like to keep the unit under $300, and at a level that anyone could make it if they wanted. So In essence, a $300 Auto DTF machine, minus the printer and accessories. is that something anyone would be interested in?
    2 points
  16. Build 2, I'll give you the $20 bucks. Looks great!
    2 points
  17. see earlier post from Dbyer. 😜
    2 points
  18. Let me shed some light, I sell DTG and DTF printers MOST IMPORTANT, and I'll discuss this later: POLYESTER cannot be done on DTG effectively, with DTF, yes! 1. Cost per print / I have strong knowledge of Brother and Kornit. Kornit printers use approx 65 cents to $1.25 depending on the model of printer; ALL other printers, Brother, Epson, et al, their cost per print is anywhere 2-5x more in ink and pretreatment DTF, the cost per square meter (approx 12 shirt fronts) is LESS THAN $3 - or approx 33 cents per shirt!!! 2. Maintenance: all use water based inks, so you have to clean more than maintain - look for a printer with RECIRCULATING white 3. Print quality - DTF without a doubt because you are printing on a solid media. DTG prints directly on ot the pretreat of the shirt. With DTG, the ink never prints ON the shirt, it prints ON the pretreat - Kornit pretreat is wet, all others are sprayed on, then they need heat sealed Neither DTG or DTF is like standard plastisol screen printing. DTG has a softer feel than plastisol. DTF has a standard transfer feel, but the print quality is the best. DTF does not peel if applied properly. DTF has its place in the industry. My wife's business, they run 4 Kornit printers, but for their staff shirts, they applied a DTF transfer. DTF, as DTG is best for MULTI color designs - where DTF excels is in production. I can print on the LOW end 15 meters per hour, or 180 shirt transfers. I have actually printed 20 meters per hour, or 240 shirt transfers. Kornit's fastest printer can do that, but its over $800,000, Brother can print 40 pieces per hour on their new printer, but you still have prep. PROCESS DTG: heat shirt, pretreat shirt, heat set pretreat, let cool, print design, heat set DTF: print film, add powder, heat set, apply to shirt - we have an AUTO machine that does all that for you What do you need for DTG? Printer, heat press, pretreat machine or hand sprayer (not consistent) What do you need for DTF? Printer and Powder/Heater unit, heat press UNLESS YOU AREdyeing a garment or screen printing discharge or water based inks, NEVER is ink "pushed into a garment." ALL process sit on top of the garment - the adherent dictates the feel Plastisol is petroleum based and it IS the adherent - they add color to plastisol - under 320F it only needs 45 seconds to cure DTG and DTF are water based inks that SIT ON TOP of the pretreat - DTG adheres to the cured pretreat - in this option, the pretreat seals the shirt so the ink cannot get lost in the fibers - DTF uses a film impregnated with PET for release and the powder applied is the adherent - you can vary the powder amount for different levels of feel The pretreat on a Kornit is wet when the ink is applied, on all other DTG units you have to cure the pretreat before you print on top of it. Our DTF printer applies the powder evenly - just like you cannot evenly apply pretreat for DTG by hand, you cannot apply powder for DTF by hand. ENTERING THE MARKET 1. I would first start by buying transfers from a reputable reseller - plastisol transfers are incredible today, but I have customers selling DTF transfers, again from MULTI color designs. Build your business, get to understand what your customers want before buying equipment Best for long runs, as the more you print, the less the print costs you due to set up 2. Screen printing - messy, dirty and expensive to enter, manuals start at $10,000 and autos start around $55,000+ There are many items you need for this venture: presses, dryers, wash out stations, screen reclaiming, dark rooms, etc. Best for shorter runs or multi color designs 3. DTG - great process, I was in this at its inception, you can enter market for as low as $14,000 for a reputable printer; you will need a way to apply your pretreat, either manually or by a machine. You cannot be consistent doing it manually. And, you will need a heat press 4. DTF - in my opinion, best thing for start ups. All you need is printer, powder applicator and heat press. Our auto system is only $15,000 Best for multi color designs and short or long runs POLYESTER DTG cannot print effectively on poly as the pretreat only adheres to cotton / so, if you have a 50/50 t-shirt, the pretreat can only stick to half of the garment It will wash off DTF, since you printing on a film, the powder applied will adhere to 100% poly and this is great for performance gear Rick
    2 points
  19. Toner is plastic, plastic cracks. I used a DIY white toner printer ( because I’m not spending that kind of cash on one). The transfers are like you would imagine- and they crack after a few washes, and it’s expensive. They have cheap not white laser transfers as well, but it all ended up the same way. Cracking, and inability to stretch with the garment. When you first make it, it looks good. But then wear it, it’s uncomfortable, and just overall feels annoying. After you wash it you start to feel like you got ripped off. DTF is ink, flexible, soft, but in very large patches can also feel kind of plastic like on the backside, since the polymer adhesive powder on the back. Get your process down and it feels like a plastisol transfer, which is good. I have washed, tested, and gave away shirts with random prints on it varying from huge to small, all white to full color. I’m my opinion, DTG is king, by far. However, DTF is a great add-on. If I had to choose between the two methods( laser vs dtf) , I would use DTF every time. I still have my laser printer and papers, two years later I haven’t found an acceptable use for them other than using them for pre-stretched canvas photos/signs or canvas bags etc. stuff that isn’t going to be worn/used. DTF is a great alternative but does take practice, and at the end of the day is pretty expensive to set up as well if you get a belt dryer. Personally I use 2 500w halogen bulbs over a metal table to cure them. After it heats up the table it takes about 15-30 seconds a print to cure, same way I cure my water based screen-printing prints. Anyway, it’s not a lie like most other products. If you read my history with it I was doubtful about it in the beginning because every other product I tried just ended up being all marketing schemes, and sucked for professional use. You’ll get some people who will argue with you about it, but it’s just not acceptable to sell if you take your business seriously and are looking for a product that will wear comfortably and wash well. DTG, DTF, screen-printing are all very acceptable, professional ways to sell garments. I personally have received only 10 bad reviews out of 5,000 reviews from over 30,000 customers using these methods. With the other methods out there( including vinyl) you just get mediocre results and feedback. To this day, I still get feedback from my customers thanking me, and bragging about it the fact that my products are not vinyl or cheap transfers, then they come back to order more. I do not just throw random things at my customers, I send free samples to some to get there unbiased opinion. DTF has been received well so far. I had no intention of using DTF professionally, I actually purchased it to confirm it was just like the rest of those products that just are not what a quality product is made of. But this time, I was proven wrong. I did not go into this thinking it would work, rather, thinking it would be a crap product. It came out great. Yes the powder is annoying, you need a small sifter to keep lumps out and make a fine “ powder” ( think like flour) to lightly coat the back. That’s when you get great results. sublimation is also an awesome product, but it’s limited to polyester( which I hate personally). they do sell some products to use it on cotton, but I have yet to experience it. at the very end of the day, when I get busy and need to produce what my business is capable of( when we get busy) , my only options are DTG and screen printing because DTF is a little time consuming. But for those one-offs and custom orders, it works well. I know I can produce 100 DTG prints in about 4 hours, about 2 with screen printing. DTF is around 50 prints in that time. If you had an automatic powdering machine, a belt dryer, and all that fancy stuff it would be much faster, but the end results are that specific method isn’t worth $10,000 to Me to produce what I can with my other equipment for less than half the initial cost, at a higher quality. sorry for the book, but ultimately it depends on what your looking to make, how many, and how much money you want to put in. If you purchased everything outright, I’d go with DTG. If you DIY, I’d do both. good luck!
    2 points
  20. For people on a budget and looking for used machine on their local marketplaces I would add the following models that are supported in widely available acrorip for 1 pass Printing. Up to13x19 Faster R3000 R2400 R2000 R2880 R1900 (have to double check and update) Up to 13x19 slower two channels for white so slower compared to above mentioned. r1390 r1400 Up to 17inch widht R3880 P800 (one time chips for the refill cartridges) If you get one of these make sure you get yoourself at least 2 sets of cartridges. One to clean the system from original ink. Another for new inks. Up to 24 inches ( have to double check when i go back home)
    2 points
  21. Yes, You need a RIP program. EKprint is $350, Acrorip is like $15 on ebay. Kothari is $1,000. Other programs are available, I do not recommend acrorip if you plan to take it seriously. Basically, You get what you put into it.
    2 points
  22. I’m still working on the ink settings in EK. I only put two white ink in the P800 for the time being. one thing to note, at least from my speculation, both the transfer film and the powder need to be in a sealed container, kept away from high humidity. aside from that, I love the feel of the prints, and the resolution is nice too. I think the biggest things with this, would be ink settings, and dealing with the powder. The final print isn’t glossy like you would imagine.
    2 points
  23. Version 1.0.0

    1,897 downloads

    This is a light / core version of our full OpenDTG code that is available to paid members. Fully functional but does not have the following features of the paid version: Support for physical buttons, it uses the desktop app only No automatic 2 pass No code to allow full removal of the ASF assembly Requirements: OpenDTG Desktop App needed to control platen Encoder and bounce2 libraries installed in Arduino IDE 5v to 3v step down of PE signal to protect the Epson mainboard. ASF assembly must be left intact. 30 Tooth Pulley for the belt drive
    2 points
  24. I'll sell you some sample size of the stuff if you want. Also, I have that demo dongle. Shoot me an email. I've been using Kothari for the DTF because it has the option to print the color before the white. (so does EK). I can share what I have so far for the Kothari environment Pricing is going to be: $169 - Ink set 250ml each CMYK and 500ml White ( I could do smaller quantity) $25 - per pound on the powder glue $1.25 - per 12.5x18 sheet. (not precision cut)
    2 points
  25. Version 1.0.0

    151 downloads

    Print these color swatches so you can match your colors in your artwork to what you'd like it to look like after being printed.
    2 points
  26. Based off of your description, I think I can confidently guess I know which software you’re referring to in each one. Looking forward to seeing your test results.
    1 point
  27. So just an update- I received my Genuine Omron relays today for the Mini shaker. First thing I noticed, they weigh over twice as much per relay. They have markings on the relays showing they are compliant and have a conformity stamp. The 2nd thing I noticed, is they are rated for 12 Amps( at 240 volts), ( which is actually more fitting for the current the heater pulls on the mini shaker). From what I can tell, ALL genuine Omron relays are stamped " Made In Indonesia" At least, all the one's I have found. If it says Made in china, Probably not authentic. I bought several units from various places, Ebay, Amazon, compatible units, etc. So far, all of them have been knock off's except the one's ordered from an electronic supplier, which actually shipped in the original OEM packaging. Overall, the device is much heavier, and built much better. The wire gauge inside the relay is thicker and more fitting, all the solder joints are very well done instead of " welded" like the clone units. The contact's appear to be much better quality, From my perspective the "contacts" appear to be much better. I personally feel MUCH more comfortable with these running inside the unit instead of the clones. Time will tell, but I think it will be fine. After seeing the clones after a couple months of use, You would easily be replacing them 3-4 times a year if you actually use the machine daily. So the Clones cost me around $8, some came with the base. In general the price varied between $5-10 some with and without the base. The Genuine Relays Cost me $9.71, without the base and without shipping, It's a flat $7.50 for shipping no matter how many you order. I'll test these out, and also order a Solid State Relay and test that as well. In the end, I just want a reliable machine that I can repair on the spot if an issue occurs, as I'm sure all of us do. If anyone needs part numbers for the relays, Just let me know. They have two compatible versions, one with the LED light and one without, both at 12A.
    1 point
  28. You can revert the firmware, just downgrade it using the firmware on Chipless solutions.com- and it will work fine.
    1 point
  29. Usually it’s on a 3” roll. Some are slightly smaller/bigger by a MM or so.
    1 point
  30. I use hot peel, because I press, wait 3 seconds then quickly peel. I also use MATTE finish, I DO NOT like Glossy finish film, it makes it look like it was made with vinyl. Cold peel does leave a different finish, if you try to peel hot or even warm it's hard to tear away. Basically, Go with hot peel, since it can also be peeled cold.
    1 point
  31. 1 point
  32. Capping station fluid is there to keep the capping station wet, and the printhead from drying out. print flush fluid, is designed to break down and flush out the ink in the lines, if your trying to clean all (most) the ink out. printhead cleaning solution is designed to clean the head and break down clogs, without damaging the printhead. clog buster is a last resort solution to use when you have a serious clog that nothing else clears, if used long enough( like it sitting in it too long) in itself can damage the head. I use printhead cleaning solution to clean everything, and distilled water for capping station solution, which, if its DTF isn't really needed, depending on the printer. if your using something like the P600/P800, the capping station fluid would help. Using it on something like an L1800 or XP-15000 I wouldn't use anything in the capping station, it can and will siphon the inks out, or mix the ink colors in the head/dampers/cartridges.
    1 point
  33. thank you reptilesink the code is available ??
    1 point
  34. It’s up to you, the 15000 works, but is new to the game and has quirks. For low volume printing, it would work fine given your technically inclined. the L1800 is a tried and tested printer, quite a few have them. the p400 is another great option for lower volume users, even high volume users who don’t want to deal with ink settling issues ( white ink is your enemy) then the p800/p600 for people who will print a lot. there are others, older machines. The p400/p600/p800 all read full inks always, the 15000 doesn’t and needs reset. personally I roll print and use the p400, and have been testing the 15000 for a few weeks now. 15000 works great, but I also know what I’m doing. It does have random quirks that the others do not have.
    1 point
  35. Any printer with a bulk ink system will suffer the same issue, Which is ink settling. Just do a head clean or two and it should be fine, however, the longer it sits, the more buildup you'll get. If you want to avoid wasted ink, use a printer with ink carts, like the P400. Carts sit directly on the head. Once your done printing, load cleaning carts, do one head clean or two and it can sit as long as you want. When you are ready to print again, load ink carts, do a head clean. The p400 uses next to no ink on the head cleans, so ink waste is next to nothing and you always get perfect prints. If you print a lot those days, just have an extra set of pre-filled ink carts on standby to swap out. If not, and you go with bulk ink systems, you'll face the issue you described. Personally I went with the p400 with 18ML carts. It seems to do roughly 30 11x10 prints before the ink is about 3/4 gone in one set.
    1 point
  36. Yup, exactly. This is definitely an odd one. I'm happy I was able to reciprocate some help back your way with the roll feeding.
    1 point
  37. I'll look into this as I have code and connections to control the feed roller to position the film for the L1800 in roll mode but haven't built the printer yet.
    1 point
  38. The shaker looks great! I can't wait to see more!
    1 point
  39. Which printer is better for dtf. Considering the picoliter of the 3880 is 3.5 and that of r 2000 is 1.5 . Does the picoliter matter
    1 point
  40. If your following the video just do what they did. you really only need to remove the rollers, usually takes less than 3-5 minutes just by popping them off with no dissembling. If you want to remove the entire mechanism that works too. You can remove everything on the front related to the paper, including the metal bracket the roller wheels were on, paper tray, and front media loading.
    1 point
  41. Daily maintaince prevents immedietly clogging, but still it will build up in head in long run. As this aspect, l1800 will be less usable with same maintaince. So it is really a question of how many prints you need per day and what is your budget. If you need over 50 prints per day, it is better to go for 8 channel printheads. L1800 is 3 times slower. If you just want to try this method and don't know where it leads(as hobby) you can start with even a L805. If A3 size is necessary then L1800.
    1 point
  42. 1 point
  43. Just open catridge cover then close it when it throws the error. You get this error when you first opened the printer and send the first job.
    1 point
  44. It's all a bit pricey, But yes, the basic concept is to remove the rollers from the printer ( You don't really need to take them apart, at least the models i've done). 1. remove rollers 2. make output tray for film to set on as it comes out ( you need it, if you think you don't you'll find out why soon enough) 3. all the supplies, heat press, conveyer dryer or whatever else. 4. rip software It has been outlined numerous times through the forum, for the most part you won't really receive answers for redundant questions.
    1 point
  45. The first type I had didn’t do this, it was thicker. I recently received the thinner stuff and that’s when that happened to me. Roll is probably the way to go anyway, no waste at the end.
    1 point
  46. With Kothari it's not much less than DTG. I'd start with your DTG settings and check the box to print color first. Then adjust from there
    1 point
  47. Yes just like the L1800 video from Hobby Print plus I added our DTG cover with the cut outs. I haven't tested storing for later. I'm sure there is a shelf life just like screen print transfers get old after a while
    1 point
  48. Version 1.0.0

    784 downloads

    This .dxf CAD file has all of the plates used in building the OpenDTG basic base kit and platen. Requires metal bending to use as is. The center rail for this design is the 1000mm C-Beam from OpenBuildspartstore.com We use aluminum but plastic or wood may work.
    1 point
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