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  1. If you can’t find it on google, I’m sure 2manuals or Orpys will have it.
    1 point
  2. Google "Epson SC-P600 service manual" and see if you can find a PDF. I believe service manuals show a basic illustration of how it can be disassembled.
    1 point
  3. Sounds like your going to replace the entire capping station. You can change the wiper without taking the printer apart. As for the Phillip's thing you turn to turn the capping station, it isn't replaceable, you replace the whole capping station at that point. The p600 is pretty easy to do, but you do need to disassemble it quite a bit. I don't have any video's, but you basically remove all the plastics covers and whatnot on that side, remove the screws that hold the bottom on and remove the screws holding it in and swap it out. sometimes takes a bit of " wiggling". You'll need a longer Philips screwdriver for some of them. Some people remove the entire plastic cover ( like the top included) but I have been able to get away with just taking the capping station side plastics loose if I'm careful. I personally unplug the printer while the head is unlocked and push it all the way over to the other side so I don't accidently damage it or something. there may be some videos out there though, maybe someone else has them. Good luck though!
    1 point
  4. For a 10x10 color\white image this is what happened, exactly the same across all 3: Acro 9 1440x1440: rip- 1 minute 9 seconds prinr- 7 minutes 2 seconds total: 8.21 minutes color accuracy 7.5/10 overall quality- 8/10 cadlink: rip- 11 seconds print 6 minutes 25 seconds total: 6.36 minutes overall color accuracy- 9/10 Overall quality - 7/10 ekprint- 1440x1440: rip- 13 seconds print- 3 minutes 42 seconds. total: 3.55 minutes overall color accuracy- 6/10 overall quality- 8/10
    1 point
  5. DTF and DTG are the same in terms of maintenance. the first and foremost rule for new users for BOTH processes: white ink is nothing like anything else you’ve encountered. It settles, it clogs faster, and cannot sit, you can’t leave it “open” or it will dry out or coagulate. It will clog More often, period. 1. you literally have to shake the ink each day. Not every other day, not sometimes. Daily. 2. you must be very specific and thorough with your cleaning. Wiper, capping station top, wet cap etc. 3. You can’t ever let the printer sit when white ink is put into it. If it’s something like an Epson p400/ dx5, you could easily clean it with cleaning cartridges and let it sit however long you want. It doesn’t have an ink system. Any printer that doesn’t have cartridges directly on the head, has an ink system, like the p600/p800. The p800 can sit longer and flush ink out better, unlike the p600, but rule of thumb, don’t let them sit more than 48 hours without printing and 24 hours without shaking the ink and carts. with that out of the way, it really depends on what you are looking for in your business. DTF has 1-2 ink layers, and a plastic powder adhesive on the back. So when finalized ON the shirt it does have a hand feel, unlike sublimation. It can be minimized though with putting down the least ink possible and learning how to use your powder. DTG uses 1-2 ink layers, and a pretreatment that must be evenly applied ( in the right amount) on the shirt, dried, then printed and dried again. DTG kn white almost feels like sublimation. Black only feels like screenprinting until washed, then feels like sublimation. Anything with white under it, has a hand feel, which depends on how you cure it. I press mine, which makes for a smooth screen printed feel. for you, DTF and DTG will have similar costs in materials. if you buy an OEM printer that requires BRANDED ink, you’ll never make money, period. I will be talking about DIY DTG vs DIY DTF. DTF ink is much cheaper than DTG ink. Literally, less than half as cheap. DTF inks last nearly twice as long. So overall it ends up being 1/4 the cost of DTG ink overall. BUT you need to factor in film and powder costs. If you buy from a supplier, it’s roughly .50 a 12x13 design for film, powder and ink are very minuscule. I pay 0.23-0.33 cents a 12x13 design. Add in ink and powder, I would guesstimate around .10 cents, my printer shows roughly 0.05-0.10 cents in ink each print. So overall, $0.43-$0.70 a 12x13 print roughly for DTF. DTG is more expensive, using Kodak/dupont ink at the cheapest price of $117 a liter color, or $125/$145 a liter white. My overall average was over $1 per print in ink, if you go OEM, like an Epson F2100 or any other “branded” ink, it’s going to run you $3-$5 a print in ink. Don’t forget pretreatment. I put down roughly $0.60 cents per dark shirt, maybe $0.30 per light( no white ink). so overall cost for one 12x13 print roughly: DTF: $0.43-$0.70 DTG: $1.60-$2.60 for aftermarket, up to $5-$6 a print for OEM. I don’t really calculate ink waste, but DTG will be more due to the higher ink cost. The rest is the same. As for washability- both are very comparable. One will crack and fade and peel over time( DTG). And one can wrinkle, peel, and bubble (DTF). If not done properly anyway. Overall if done correctly, they are about the same. for terms of hand feel and quality, DTG will always be softer, but it depends. without white, it wins, always. With white, it wins, in terms of hand feel on large patches. Now, DTF can feel equally the same if you are printing a broken up design. If you print a large patch, like a giant green circle, it does feel like a layer of plastic on the shirt. overall, if done right, both are acceptable. I will break down my opinion on the best hand feel. 1. waterbased screenprinting 2Plastisol screenprinting 3 DTG 4 DTF 5, the worst is any laser/inkjet transfer product. now for the cheapest to expensive: 1. Plastisol screenprinting ( for larger runs) 2. Waterbased screenprinting 3. DTF 4. DTG 5 any other transfer as mentioned above. Overall, there isn’t a “best”. DTF is easier, cheaper, but does have a plastic like hand feel on large patches. Still acceptable and many places like Nike or under armor use it for their products. If done right though, you can almost completely remove that plastic feel for white only. White and color printed at the same time will always feel Like a sheet of plastic in large patches. DTG is more expensive but offers a softer hand feel and doesn’t feel like plastic, if done right. I prefer DTF for everyday normal stuff, and DTG for my premium stuff. DTG is harder to convert, much harder than DTF. They both have their place. dont forget, DTG is Limited to flat objects, any variation in thickness required You to lower your platen which sucks to do. DTF can transfer to just about anything or any shape you can press with heat. basic cost of getting into dtf: $500-$2000 for entry level. basic cost of getting into dtg: $1000-$3000 for entry level.
    1 point
  6. Based off of your description, I think I can confidently guess I know which software you’re referring to in each one. Looking forward to seeing your test results.
    1 point
  7. Thanks for the clarification, that’s exactly what EKprint does on it’s supported printers as well, well not exactly but close. It just doesn’t extend the paper any further and starts printing on the next file making it continuous, so it never ejects or extends between “ paper loads”. pretty cool to do that on the hardware side, nice job.
    1 point
  8. Just anywhere. If you can’t find one I have three new ones, I’d sell you one. I have empty carts as well. I could do $10 a set of empty carts and $20 for the resetter plus shipping- if your in the USA
    1 point
  9. Absolutely and thank you. And since this post, I have found some pretty interesting information. Buying from Andy, for example, It costs less than $0.60 for a 13x12 inch transfer, your looking at $.46 in film from Andy's roll. The ink costs, I use 60ML per 35 transfers, or 1.72ML per print. Not 100% coverage, but in general a good idea. For white, the most expensive, your looking at .067 cents in ink per print. So far, We are at .46+.07, or $0.53 cents a transfer. Add the powder, Which I seem to be using about a pound per roll of film, or 320ish transfers, again 0.06 cents. Now, I'm being very conservative on this, since I don't use a full pound, or exactly 60ML of ink, I'm rounding up a bit. My designs/prints are not " solid" giant boxes, so if you print those, it'll cost you a bit more. But, The figure would be correct within 0.20 cents no matter how much ink the design uses for that size. So overall, purchasing this stuff from Andy, I'm looking at $0.59 cents a 13x12 transfer. A comparable DTG print, My programs said over $1.50 using Dupont ink, sometimes hitting over the $2 mark per print and firebird pre-treatment( bulk price, I.E by the liter for ink, and by the 5 gallon for pre-treatment). Now, for me, DTG will waste much more ink, but it's a different scenario since I'm using a printer that removes the ink system for DTF, since it uses so little ink so I don't have to deal with ink settling in the lines. Overall, I don't see a reason for anyone to be trying to make it cheaper than $0.60 cents a print that large, if your doing CMYK/White full color images, add another 4 cents per print in ink. Every other supplier I have found, charges quite a bit more than DTFSuperstore.com, making that number much higher. The only thing I could see someone saving a few bucks, would be the film. Even then, it's not worth the hassles of running into bum/different film since they all seem to have variants that require ink setting changes. For example The rolls I ordered from China, 1 worked perfect, the other 4 all had a serious issue and wasn't usable which stopped me in the water putting my orders behind. All to save $30 per roll, or $0.09 cents per print. I ended up losing quite a bit of money, with refunds, and of course the loss of the cost of the bad film. Mind you, this film was " identical" and you could not tell a difference until you started printing, so factor in the wasted ink/powder/time. Andy's film worked great, and I asked if these issues occur within his product. He said it hasn't happened, but if it does, he would be more than happy to exchange the defective product. I believe him, and have been a good customer here for over 3 years I believe is how long it has been ( I'm not the best at keeping track of time). Overall, for roughly 60 cents above the cost of your garment, you can have a full size print, ready to apply to any garment, without setup, screens, or any real amount of work. The quality is great, if you do it right. The white only prints turn out ALOT better than DTG. for black only designs, DTG has it beat still, since it will have no hand feel at all with DTG. I'm a cheap person in general, not " get what you pay for" type of person, more of a " get the best deal" type of person. I vouch for the process 100%, and for Andy's products, if that means anything to anyone. ,
    1 point
  10. I don’t think any of your options are good. it’s a pretty simple process to DIY. The printer comes with the head that Epson put in it, that’s it. You can change the manifold, but it’s not going to print faster by swapping out parts. The reason the bigger machines can work like that is because Epson sells printheads to them and they design the machine around that. But even then, it’s just the difference between 8 ink channels( dual I3200, ) or 16 ink channels( quad I3200). The Epson made printers can’t have a different “faster” printhead. if your concerned with speed, get a better printer. If your concerned with support, buy from a reputable company. If you want a decent rip, look at the available US options. Kothari, Cadlink, EKprint, etc. ekprint and Cadlink have easily contactable support teams, who are willing to help quickly. Acro rip sucks, in my opinion. Time lost on the “ rip” process is expensive. That and just like the other “no name” rips, your not going to find a solid support system when you need it. I have used EKprint for 4 years. While they take 24-48 hours to respond, it’s been a fantastic investment. for DTF, I’m looking at the upgrade to Cadlink, who has even faster support. if your taking this seriously and want to make any decent money at it, and don’t have experience enough to proceed without any support from your supplier, you’ll regret your purchase as posted above, in my opinion. If your stuck on the L1800, just import one and convert it yourself. I made a complete DIY machine for under $700 including the printer. This prints, powders, cures, and rolls up the film for you. Using the p400, producing about 35 full sized prints an hour. Even this, is almost too slow for me but the fastest the p400 will go. It’s not a pissing contest on how cheap I made it, but rather a point to get across. If you purchase everything I used( since I used scrap parts that would normally have went in the trash) it would cost you around $1,000-$1,200. My design isn’t even great, I usually suck at these things. But it works, and has been reliably. My point is, the knowledge is the most important part, and if your “buying” something, you 100% need that “ knowledge” from its creators, all around. It’s almost more important than the quality of the product itself. it didn’t need a vacuum tray to hold the film, it didn’t need a pre-heater, or any of the other fancy stuff they add and it’s fine. i recommend doing some more research, and buying from someone who can help you. The questions you ask, tells me you’ll need support at some point, so I would purchase what you need from someone who stands behind their products. for a good $2,000-$3,500 you can have a decent, purchased set-up. Genuinely, you get what you pay for in this field. Since I started actually using my printer about 3 weeks ago, I have produced over 600 transfers, and it has made me over $6,000. however, I have over 4 years experience with this type of thing, and I’ve had DTF since around September of last year. So keep in mind what your looking for in return when you invest into something. DIY will always be cheaper, but without the time and research you can achieve the same results from spending a little more cash. going to “China” and buying a random unit, is always a terrible experience. You need a good support system, someone who will help you with things that everyone encounters. I started with openDTG DTG printers 4 years ago, which has been a priceless experience. meaning it’s given me the knowledge and support to turn my business into something that has had over 35,000 customers since we started. Without that support system, this wouldn’t have been the outcome, even to this day, I get help when I need it the most so I’m never stuck unable to make orders. I wish you the best of luck, but knowledge is power, some sellers out there are to take your money. Putting it out their, everyone will tell you what you want to hear to get your business, no matter the outcome. the very few will actually stand behind you and your product. Which is why me personally, I’m here.
    1 point
  11. I have no idea how it's going to turn out, could be a total dud. But, this is one version of what I'll be trying for the film roller.
    1 point
  12. Version 1.0.0

    146 downloads

    Epson L1800 Adjustment Program
    1 point
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